Parks and commons

Bramford Gardens

  • Children’s playground
  • Community garden
  • Cycle superhighway

About: Located by the busy Wandsworth Bridge roundabout, this park offers a pleasant oasis from constant traffic. A refurbishment in 2005 (and well established by 2010) introduced a colour scheme of yellows, reds, and ice blues that provides colour and interest throughout the year. Its low maintenance, semi-formal, drought tolerant design makes an impact at a distance.  From within, the ornamental cherries and silver birches afford protection from the road and railway, as well as providing delicately attractive dappled shade.

It is well used by walkers to Wandsworth Town Station, bus stops, Old York Road, or streets behind the railway.  A cycle superhighway, route CS8, crosses through the Gardens.  There is a children’s play area immediately by the main road.

History: Bramford Road Open Space was created from the demolition of the lower end of Bramford Road, Cotman Street, and part of York Road, in the road building schemes of 1970s. It was remained as Bramford Gardens in 2009.  The Bramford Community Garden volunteers have maintained part of the park since 2012.

Entrances: Old York Road, Swandon Way, under railway arch to Podmore Road and Bramford Road

Next nearest green places:  Wandsworth Common; greens on Birdhurst Road are owned and managed by TfL

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Dog control map

 

Christchurch Gardens

  • Pocket park
  • Formal gardens
  • Historic interest – Grade II listed shelter and civilian war memorial

About:  Christchurch Gardens is a small memorial rose garden with lawns and trees in the heart of Battersea at the junction of Battersea Park Road and Cabul Road.

History:  Triangular in shape, this open space was first laid out as “an outdoors drawing room” in 1885 by Battersea Vestry and supported by the Metropolitan Parks and Gardens Trust.

The brick shelter providing seating displays a plaque to commemorate the men, women and children of Battersea who lost their lives in during the Second World War.  The Citizens of Battersea War Memorial Shelter was listed by English Heritage as Grade II importance in 2015.  It is an eloquent witness to the tragic impact of world events on the local community and the sacrifice it made in the Second World War and being next to the site of a church destroyed by bombing, gives the memorial added poignancy.  The shelter is a carefully designed and executed structure, providing public seating for quiet contemplation in a public garden;

Local street names, Afghan, Cabul, Candahar and Khyber Roads, commemorate campaigns of the Second Anglo-Afghan War, 1878 to 1881, shortly before the Gardens were laid out.

Entrance:  two pedestrian gates on Cabul Road.  A granite horse trough now filled in was provide by the Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association immediately outside the park gate.

Next nearest green places:  Shillington Park, Falcon Park, York Gardens, Harroway Gardens

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Dog control map

Coronation Gardens

  • Amenity parkland, mature trees
  • Historic interest
  • Spring bulb display

About: This is a good sized local park next to the local school which retains vestiges of its original formal garden design and intention.  Mainly level lawns with formal layout of paths, both a line and a circle of mature London plane trees, and other colourful shrubs and rose beds.  The circulation and cross paths provide a good walk from which to view the whole of this green place, and provide a pleasant and much used route between Southfields and Wandsworth.  An avenue of horse chestnuts and spring daffodils invite visitors from the gates up to the main park area.

History:  Laid out in 1903 to commemorate the coronation of Edward VII, Coronation Gardens was first park created by the Borough of Wandsworth (nearby Wandsworth Park created the same year was the work of the London County Council.)  Mayor William Lancaster gave the land to be a public park and his sisters donated the (now defunct) granite drinking fountain.  Previously the land had been a pig farm and there was much public concern that Riversdale School was adjacent to it.

The wide grass lawn along Pirbright Road is a later addition.

Entrances:  Merton Road, Pirbright Road

Next nearest green places:  King George’s Park.  Wimbledon Park is managed by Merton Council.

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Dog control map

Falcon Park

  • Amenity parkland with wildlife area
  • Open area for dog exercise

About: Falcon Park is edged with copses of native trees around the perimeter and has an open expanse of grass beloved by dog walkers. It is bounded on both sides by railway lines and known locally as the ‘Banana Park’ due to its shape.

History:  Both this park and the neighbouring Shillington Park originate in the open spaces left after World War 2 bomb damage.  Marks of a previous street of houses can occasionally be detected below the grass in hot dry summers. In 1971 the Greater London Council handed the land to Wandsworth Council who decided to develop the area as public parks.

The name ‘Falcon’ derives from the family crest of the St John family who held the manor of Battersea from 1627 to 1763.  Other names associated with the St John family that persist locally include Bolingbroke Grove, Grandison Road and Falcon Road.

Entrances:  Latchmere Passage off Cabul Road, and via the railway arch from Shillington Park.

Next nearest green places:  Shillington Park, Christchurch Gardens, Latchmere Recreation Ground, Battersea Park

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Dog control map

Fishponds Playing Fields 

In response to requests from local residents Wandsworth Council has decided to open up Fishponds playing fields for the use and enjoyment of local people as an open space.

Normally the playing fields are only used by sports clubs that have made a pitch booking. However in order to make better use of this green amenity, the council has decided that whenever there is a pitch booking, and a member of staff is on site, the playing fields can be used by all other local residents as a neighbourhood park.

These arrangements will come into effect on Saturday 20 April and continue until Sunday 1 September 2019.

Opening hours:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 9am to 4pm

Wednesday: 9am to 1pm

Saturday and Sunday: 9am to 4pm

The gates to the playing fields will remain locked at other times in order to prevent them being used for anti-social behaviour. People are also advised that dogs are not permitted on the playing fields at any time.

 

Fountain Rec

  • Amenity parkland
  • Children’s playground
  • Ball games area (free use)
  • Tennis table (free use)

About: Quiet local park hidden behind back gardens, undulating grass bounded by shrubs and trees for spring blossom, summer shade, and autumn colour. Asphalt surface area for ball games – nets, goals, kick-wall, a tennis table and teen shelter – free to use. Wheelchair accessible pedestrian perimeter path. A small children’s play area in one corner.

History: The site had earlier served as a clay quarry for brickworks (Kiln Mews is nearby and larger brickworks stood on the other side of the railway).  In 1898 the quarry was replaced by the Council’s ‘dust destructor’, a scheme for disposing of the Borough’s rubbish by incineration.  This occupied the site until its demolition on 30 October 1930.  The chimney was 153ft high, 32 years old, and weighed 800 tons.  Work to build the recreation ground was part of the scheme for the relief of unemployment. A portion was laid down to grass and the remainder paved and equipped with swings and see-saws.

Entrances: off Alston Road, and through the arch of Anderson House on Fountain Road.

Next nearest green places:  Tooting Gardens, and Lambeth Cemetery which is owned by Lambeth Council

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Dog control map

Fred Wells Gardens

  • Toddler playground
  • Junior playground
  • Tennis court (free use)
  • Picnic benches
  • No BBQs
  • Dogs allowed

Dog control map

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Address: Vicarage Crescent, SW11 3LA
Entrances: Vicarage Crescent, Orville Road
Next nearest greenspaces:  Harroway Gardens, York Gardens, Christchurch Gardens

About

The contoured landscaping characterised by trees, shrubs and open grass areas and intertwined with winding paths, add intrigue and interest to this local park. Despite its relatively small size, the park provides opportunity for various activities, with several distinct areas being well established including the junior and toddler playgrounds and the tennis court.

History

Fred Wells Gardens went through many incarnations before it became a public park. This includes being the site of a railway station 1863 to 1940, a greyhound racing track between the wars, as well as witnessing bombing during the Second World War which destroyed many of the houses that once stood on the land.

Fred Wells Gardens officially became a park in the 1980’s and was named in honour of Fred Wells, a long-serving Labour Councillor and ex-Alderman, who represented Latchmere Ward. On 2 April 1982 The Wandsworth Borough News reported the passing of Fred Wells aged 69 years. In a tribute from a political opponent it was said he could not turn anyone away who had a problem and it was suspected that this admirable characteristic had eventually taken its toll on his health.

Latest news

Fred Wells Gardens Improvements Consultation

Phase 1 of the Fred Wells Gardens Improvements Consultation was held from 28 January 2019 to 24 March 2019.

On behalf of Wandsworth Council, Enable Leisure and Culture has secured £316,500 to fund improvements to Fred Wells Gardens.

Funding has been secured through the following channels:
• £220,000 from Wandsworth Council’s Local Fund in June 2017.
• £80,000 to fund play space enhancements from developers at 12-14 Lombard Street and £16,500 from other planning contributions.

The consultation asked for the public’s feedback on the following:

Group A works: These works are classified as essential to the ongoing safety and / or maintenance of the park and therefore were not presented as options to choose between. However, we still wanted to hear people’s views on the proposed solutions and make sure we had not missed anything.

Group B works: We were also asking for help to prioritise some potential improvement works through this consultation. These works, although important, are less fundamental to the overall safety of the park and given that funds are limited it is likely that some of the less popular proposals in this group will not be funded through this round of investment. Therefore, we asked people to rank Group B works according to how important they felt they are to their enjoyment of the park.

The results of this consultation are currently being analysed. We will update this page as soon as we have the results.

 

Furzedown Recreation Ground

  • Children’s playgrounds
  • Ball court (free use)
  • Skate park
  • Tennis courts
  • No dogs in any part of this park
Address: Ramsdale Road, SW17 9BP
Entrances: Furzedown Drive, Ramsdale Road, Chillerton Road
Next nearest greenspaces:  Tooting Common

About

In contrast to the nearby woods and wider common, this local park succeeds in packing many facilities into a small, formal area for the local Furzedown residents. A scattering of mature trees mark the boundaries. Within, the park is divided into ‘courts’ with something here for people of every age. Two tennis courts are now managed under contract to the Council. Teenagers from nearby Graveney School spend lunchtime at the picnic tables. Both play areas are popular at every out of school opportunity. The ball games and skate board courts are the frequent destination of active youth. Despite the general bustle and busyness there is an orchard of young fruit trees that will become a quiet shady spot for relaxation and the simple enjoyment of sunlight and being out of doors.

History

The Rec occupies a high point of the former Furzedown Estate. Until the first world war it was entirely covered in tennis courts. In 1921 Wandsworth Council bought the land for housing then decided to add a children’s playground, drinking fountains, tennis courts, bowling greens, a putting green, and a refreshments hut with toilets (the proposal for a croquet lawn was not taken up). Construction fell into the scheme for the relief of unemployment, which also provided King George’s Park. Furzedown Rec was opened the public in 1924.

Latest news

Furzedown Recreation Ground Park Improvements Consultation

Phase 1 of the Furzedown Recreation Ground Improvements Consultation was held from 15 June 2018 to 27 July 2018.

£111,000 from Wandsworth Council’s Wandworth Local Fund is being used to fund the current refurbishment of the Furzedown Rec pavilion. Following on from the work done by the Friends of Furzedown Rec over the last two years, the consultation was held to find out what activities local people would like to see going on in the pavilion once it had been refurbished.
The aim of the funding is to make the pavilion fit for community use and this has been supported by the local community and in particular, the Friends of Furzedown Rec. We envisage the refurbished pavilion will become a key community hub, which will be available for community groups to rent out.
Through this consultation, the public’s views were also sought on the wider Furzedown Recreation Ground, to help us consider how we might improve the park in the future. The results of this consultation have been helping us gain an understanding of what the priorities are for the recreation ground, which includes the slide and the mound, to help us with our funding bids.
The central aims of the consultation were to:
  • Find out what types of activities people would like to see going on in the pavilion
  • Gain a more detailed understanding of how people use the park, what they like about the park and what improvements they think could be made
  • Hear people’s feedback on potential options for a new slide in the playground. We would then seek funding for the most popular approach, subject to a thorough assessment of the practicalities and sustainability of the option
For a summary of the main findings of the consultation and some of the plans that have been drawn up in response to the results of this consultation, please click below:

Furzedown Recreation Ground Park Improvements Consultation Feedback Poster

For more information about the consultaiton, please visit Wandsworth Council’s consultation pages: https://haveyoursay.citizenspace.com/parks-open-spaces/furzedown-18/consult_view/

Furzedown Recreation Ground Pavilion Refurbishments Updates

Works to refurbish the pavilion are due to be completed by the end of June.

Once works are completed, the pavilion will be available to rent out on an ad hoc basis to begin with. For more information about booking the pavilion, please contact tast@enablelc.org or by call 0203 959 0028.

 

Garratt Green

  • Amenity parkland
  • Spring bulb display, copses of native trees, woodland garden
  • Children’s playground
  • Tennis table (free use)
  • Sports pitches (bookable)
  • Open area for dog exercise

About: Flat, wide and open, Garratt Green offers something for everyone in various distinct places.  A playground and toddlers’ play area in one corner; teen equipment alongside the woodland area; fruit trees, woodland and undergrowth, a newly refurbished woodland garden, dog-walking amenity grass, colourful displays of spring bulbs, and sports pitches provide a range of facilities for all ages. While there is no formal circulation path there is nothing to impede circulation of the whole site.

History: This site is designated as common land which has governed its development. Its origins as common land go back centuries.  During the 18th century the Mayors of Garratt competed for election to protect Garratt Green for pubic access.  The elections became notoriously bawdy and were discontinued.

Entrances: Burntwood Lane, Aboyne Road, Barnfield Close

Next nearest green places:  Garratt Park; Swaby Gardens

View the facilities

Dog control map

Garratt Park

  • Amenity parkland with ornamental planting
  • Children’s playground
  • Ball games area (free use)
  • Tennis table (free use)
  • Sport pitch (bookable)
  • Cycle track (free use)

About:  This large level green area is made interesting with a good scattering of year-round colour with blossom, bulbs and shrubs. Circulation paths, a playground with its own shrub maze, a grass sports pitch and a multi-games area all have their place inside the park.  A purpose built 1950s cycle speedway track remains for informal use.  Seats and picnic tables allow people to linger and chat.

Across the far side of the park are an allotment field and the old rifle range.

History: Land along the River Wandle was the garden and mill pond attached to Garratt Mill by Trewint Street.  Garratt Park was opened as a public park ‘for children’s recreation’ in May 1906. During both world wars much of the grass area was used for allotment food growing.  By 1920s, the park had retreated to the southern end and the rest was used as a Wandsworth Council depot.  Post WW2 the park had returned to its full size and original purpose for children’s recreation.  in 1970s a mini-townscape and toy road lay-out was created, now formal flowerbeds.

Entrances: Siward Road, Weybourne Street

Next nearest green places:  Swaby Gardens, Garratt Green

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Dog control map

Godley Gardens

  • Pocket park
  • Spring bulbs and ornamental trees

About: Blossom trees provide colour and fruit in this island park set amid residential streets. The park is fenced with low level railings and is the meeting place for local children, though no formal play equipment is located here. It is a quiet sitting out area with a raised planting area and colourful shrubs.  The park is on a gentle slope of grass fenced by half-height spear-top railings. Although the original lay-out had criss-cross paths from each corner, currently a paved path takes an L-shaped route and only connects two of the four gates.

History: The public green was designed as part of the Fieldview Estate, laid out by Wandsworth Council in the 1930s. The Estate was designed on a grid of streets with groups of maisonettes in semi-detached housing, with wide footpaths, grass verges (now tarmaced) and attractive street trees. Original designs indicate the open green as a building plot, possibly for a church, which never materialised. The Godley Road Open Space was provided as a central area of public open space.

Entrances: a gate at each of the four corners, two on Godley Road and two on Tilehurset Road

Next nearest green places: Wandsworth Common; Wandsworth Cemetery.  Springfield Park is owned by South West London St George’s Health Trust.

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Dog control map

Harroway Gardens

  • Pocket park
  • Children’s playground

About: Situated in a fast changing corner of Battersea of new residential developments, this relatively small park is an important focal point of greenery for a growing population. The Gardens are in a green well surrounded by medium and high rise blocks overlooking the mature tree cover. A short distance from the heliport and the riverside walk.

History: On Yelverton and Harroway Roads were small rows of Victorian terrace housing in a semi-industrial area near the Lombard Road power station.  Much of this area adjacent to the railway line suffered significant bomb damage during World War Two. The Caius House was set up as a College mission to help the disadvantaged young people of Battersea and is next to the park.  Development came in the late 1970s when Totteridge House and housing estate were laid out; the power station was replaced by a timber yard; Harroway Road itself was closed and part pedestrianised.  The park is mounded up, probably using brick and rubble from demolished buildings.

Entrance:  Yelverton Road

Next nearest green places:  York Gardens, Fred Wells Gardens

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Dog control map

Heathbrook Park

  • Amenity parkland
  • Ball court (bookable)
  • Children’s playground
  • Outdoor gym equipment (free use)
  • Open area for dog exercise

About: Here is a secret well hidden from traffic on the nearby Wandsworth Road. Once inside, mature trees and a surprisingly large green space become apparent. Shrubs, picnic tables, and small mounds edge round the open space.  The park is well used by dog walkers. A circulation path allows a continuous walk around a large green where the gym equipment was installed in 2010 and is regularly in use.  Families and children from the local school enjoy meeting there.

History: Heathbrook Park was opened in 1978.  It is one of several green places in Battersea that were made into public parks from derelict land created by World War II bomb damage.

Entrances: St Rule Street; Portslade Road, and via the Westbury Estate

Next nearest green places: Montefiore Gardens.  Clapham Common and Larkhall Park both managed by Lambeth Council.

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Dog control map

King George’s Park

Main gate: Buckhold Road SW18Other gates: Mapleton Road, Neville Gil Close, Kimber Road, Burr Road and Bodmin StreetAbout: It features formal and ornamental gardens, an ecology site, lake and riverside walk. A play area, adventure playground and one o’clock club for children. Sports pitches, a leisure centre, bowling green and tennis for sports enthusiasts.

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Dog control map

Latchmere Recreation Ground

  • Local park
  • Historic interest
  • Children’s playground

About: Latchmere Recreation Ground retains a glimpse of formality from the Edwardian era when it was laid out by Battersea Council complimentary to the new Latchmere Estate. The mature trees and railings lend a ‘town square’ feel to this green place. The children’s play area, lawns and quiet seating make this a park for everyone.  The park is divided by a walkway, and two magnificent weeping willow trees adorn one side of it.

History: Laid out in 1906 to house the controversial Brown Dog statue that had been donated to Battersea Council by the Anti-Vivisection League, it served as a recreation ground for children on the new Latchmere Estate.  The plinth and statue stood in the empty central circle until mysterious removed in 1912.  The land had previously been one of the largest allotments sites in Surrey.

Entrances: Burns Road and Reform Street

Next nearest green places: Battersea Park, Falcon Park

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Dog control map

Lavender Gardens

  • Pocket park
  • Children’s playground

About: This park provides a shady children’s playground and passage with steps down into the superstore, a wide shrubbery catches the sun with colour and textural interest. There are sitting out areas beneath the trees with views across the large car parking area.

History: This public park is one of several in Battersea newly created from derelict land caused by World War II bomb damage. A scattering of bombs had demolished several small areas around Dorothy Road and Kathleen Road. Several of these were filled with prefabs for many years, at least into the 1970s.  However, as part of the development of the supermarket and car park off Lavender Hill, it enabled provision of a passageway from Latchmere Road through to Kathleen Road and Dorothy Road to the superstore.

Entrances: Dorothy Road, step access to superstore

Next nearest green places: Clapham Common is managed by Lambeth Council.

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Dog control map

Leader’s Gardens

  • Local park with ornamental planting
  • Children’s playgrounds
  • Café
  • Tennis courts (bookable)

About: Popular riverside park on the well used Putney embankment, busy with walkers, cyclists and rowers. Café, tennis courts and play areas, shady trees and views across the Thames. The Beverley Brook enters the big river nearby, overlooked by a quiet lawn and sitting out area.

History: Leader’s Gardens opened to the public in 1903 as a formal park with paved paths and shrub borders.  Tennis courts were added during 1930s.  Public toilets were installed on Ashlone Road during 1950s and the area in front of it became playground. The council depot by Beverley Brook was incorporated into the park during 1970s.  Flood defence works of 1980s added the various ramps and raised ground and extended the park to the Beverley Brook. New gates were opened in opposite corners.

The southern path was taken outside the park and is maintained by the Council’s Highways section.

Entrances: Putney Embankment, Ashlone Road, Festing Road

Next nearest green places: Wandsworth Park.  Bishop’s Park is managed by Hammersmith and Fulham Council.  Barnes Common is managed by Richmond Parks Service.

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Dog control map

Montefiore Gardens

  • Pocket park
  • Children’s playground

About: An open green between tree-lined Montefiore and Tennyson Streets, ornamental trees dot the lawns while shrubs add colour and texture.  Ornamental trees are dotted around the lawns, with low-level shrub beds that soften the edges, add colour and texture, and leave clear views across the green area. White flanking walls give a bright backdrop for the play of shadows of the bare winter branches. A picnic area in one corner, and play area in the slightly mounded centre. No dogs allowed.

History:  This public park is one of several in Battersea that were created out of World War II bomb damage. Prefabs stood here until 1970s, when the park was laid out and a council children’s centre.

Montefiore Street and Tennyson Street form part of the ‘diamond’ estate around Queenstown Road, developed in the late 19th century by James Knowles and Philip Flower. Queenstown Road was built to connect Clapham and the Common with the relatively new Battersea Park.  Until then much of this area had been farmland belonging to the Longhedge Farm between Battersea Fields and Clapham Common.

Entrances: Montefiore Street, Tennyson Road

Next nearest green places: Queenstown Green, Heathbrook Park

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No dogs allowed in this park

Putney Park Lane

  • Linear track with wildlife interest and historic interest
  • Open area for dog exercise

Main gate: Upper Richmond Road SW15

Other gates: Putney Heath, several access points in between

About: Historic country lane connecting Upper Richmond Road to Putney Heath. A traffic-free thoroughfare, surfaced with rough gravel, lined with a variety of mature and shady trees, the Lane runs alongside the 1920s Dover House Estate for part of its route, and is otherwise backed by garden fences. Roughly two thirds along the Lane is the wide green park known as The Pleasance.

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Dog control maps

Queenstown Green

  • Pocket park

About:  This small public park provides a green break in the close residential terraces, which complements the greenery of St Philip’s Church opposite (Grade II listed). Although slightly set back from the busy traffic street, in spring the ornamental blossom is a welcome sight visible for some distance along the road.  It is the only green place for dog walking locally.

History: The Green is one of several public parks in Battersea that were newly created from World War II bomb damage.  Here and other bombsites were used immediately as sites for pre-fabs to ease the housing shortage. A number of sites were retained as public gardens, in part to honour the memory of those killed in the bombing raids.   Queenstown Green may be retained  in memory of civilian casualties.

Queenstown Road is the main thoroughfare of the Park Town ‘diamond’ estate laid out in a diamond formation by Cyril Flower, later Lord Battersea, in 1870s. The church is said to be named for his father, Philip Flower.

Entrance: Queenstown Road

Next nearest green place: Montefiore Gardens, Battersea Park, Heathbrook Park

Shillington Park

  • Amenity parkland with wildlife area
  • Children’s playground
  • Outdoor gym equipment (free use)
  • Open area for dog exercise

About: Ornamental shrubs, sitting out areas, and undulating grass covered mounds surround a wide flat area, this is a place of vistas that lead the walker on through the park. The George Shearing Centre for special needs teenagers and the Sacred Heart Primary School ball games areas  immediately abut the park.

History: Both Shillington and its neighbouring Falcon Parks originate in the open spaces left after World War Two.  The falcon was used in the family crest of the St John family who held the manor of Battersea (from 1627 to 1763.  Other family names known locally include Bolingbroke and Grandison.  Shillington Street has disappeared, leaving the park and former school building to carry the name.

Entrances: Cabul Road, Este Road, Batten Street

Next nearest green place:  Falcon Park, Christchurch Gardens, Latchmere Rec.

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Dog control map

Swaby Gardens

  • Children’s playground
  • Dogs are not allowed in any part of this park

About: This park provides a popular play area within a large traffic island set in residential streets. Shady trees and a small grassed area, much of the space is playground for juniors and for toddlers. The park is fenced with railings.

History: The public green was designed as part of the Openview Estate, laid out by Wandsworth Council in the 1920s. The Estate was laid out with symmetrical groups of houses with Swaby Road Recreation Ground as a central rectangular of open space, and two roads leading away from it diagonally.  Until 1960s it was a formal green.  Since then it has become a busy and much loved children’s playground.

Entrances: Swaby Road, corner of Aldrich Terrace and Leckford Road

Next nearest green place:  Garratt Park, Garratt Green

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Dog control map

The Pleasance

  • Amenity parkland with spring bulbs and mature trees
  • Historic interest
  • Children’s playground

About:  Colourful line of spring bulbs and variety of mature tree cover encouraging birdlife. This aptly named park is located in the heart of the 1920s Dover House Road cottage garden estate and is overlooked by quiet residential streets. The unmade-up Putney Park Lane track runs by on one side connecting the busy Upper Richmond Road with the quiet Putney Heath at the top of the hill.  The Pleasance is an open green which supports a variety of trees with much birdlife.  A small ‘natural’ play area is at one end.

History: Large historic green dating from mediaeval times.  Long ago this was the site of a mediaeval hunting lodge that belonged to the Archbishop of Canterbury. By the eighteenth century the hunting lodge had been replaced by one of several grand mansions that lined Putney Park Lane. The Pleasance has retained its woodland appearance. The Dover House Estate was built up around The Pleasance in 1920s.

Entrance: open access from Putney Park Lane and The Pleasance

Next nearest green places: Putney Park Lane

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Dog control map

News: new swing for the Pleasance

Summary: The Pleasance Nature Engagement Sessions Report

Tooting Gardens

  • Local park
  • Children’s playground

About: The full extent of Tooting Gardens and the greenery within are well hidden from the street. The Gardens opens into a large rectangle, a play area with its footprint of overlapping circles, and views across the park deflected by grass mounds.  Paths wind round several good sized shady trees that provide spring blossom.  A flat open area of grass affords informal recreation.  The park offers a pleasant alternative route around the hospital.  An old decorative wall with a pattern of regular columns topped with bands in brick-red and sandy yellow separates the green place from the hospital perimeter route.  At the further end a second gate (designed to imitate pipework) gives out to a footpath leading to Greaves Place and to Gambole Road.

History: Tooting Gardens lies adjacent to St George’s Hospital, which replaced the Grove Hospital and the Fountain Road Fever Hospital, built in 1893 on the edge of the still distinct ‘village’ of Tooting.   Summerstown, the next hamlet, was across fields in the 1890s.  By the First World War the streets in between had been developed. Tooting Gardens was laid out in 1912 on the abandoned site of the ‘old Tooting slop shoot’. This local point for rubbish collection was probably replaced by the Borough ‘dust destructor’ at the other end of Fountain Road in about 1898.

Entrances: Cranmer Terrace, ally leading to Gambole Road

Next nearest green places: Fountain Rec

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Dog control map

Wandsworth Common

Main gate: Open access from Bolingbroke Road, Bellevue Road, Trinity Road, Burntwood Lane, Sandgate Road, Lyford Road, Baskerville Road, Dorlcote Road, Windmill Road, Heathfield Road, Wandsworth Common West Side, and Wandsworth Common North Side.About: South-west London is well provided with open common land dating back to mediaeval origins. The Commons today are protected by legislation over and above other public parks. They provide wide sweeps of natural landscape and amenity sports facilities. Wandsworth Common includes the former Battersea West Heath replete with boundary markers. There are woods, lakes, and heath, as well as playgrounds, café, bowls and tennis, and a trim trail.

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Dog control map SW11 area

Dog control map SW18 area

 

Wandsworth Park

Main gate: Putney Bridge Road SW18.Other gates: Mount Pleasance and Blade Mews.About: Grade II listed Edwardian park laid out with ornamental shrubberies and sports areas, blends formality with informality. Magnificent avenue of London planes provides shade and a view of the wide open river – opportunity to watch sports, birds and passing boats. By the play area and café is an up-to-date putting green.

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Dog control map

York Gardens

  • Amenity parkland with wildlife areas, spring bulb display, and woodland
  • Ball games area (free use)
  • Children’s playground
  • Tennis table (free use)
  • Outdoor gym equipment (free use)
  • Open area for dog exercise

About: York Gardens is a pleasant level park comprising a large green, plenty of seats and small trees that provide shade round the edges and a little colour and blossom. Raised banks at the outside edges give height for looking over the park and offer ‘wild, natural’ areas and woodland walks – rated as of borough importance.  The park is located near to where the Falcon Brook gives in to the Thames and a pumping station effectively divides the park in two.   Circulation paths allow a continuous walk around a large green where the gym equipment is located installed 2010 but no sports pitch.

History: In 1971 the Council took the opportunity to clear up the borough and improve the range of public facilities, including further new housing. The Council’s ‘first new park for fifty years’, York Gardens, was formally opened in 1972, to provide open space for the new housing nearby.

York Road is so-named for the former Archbishops of York who maintained a London palace adjacent to the River Thames in Battersea.

Entrances: Plough Road, York Road, Lavender Road, Newcomen Road, Wye Street

Next nearest green places: Harroway Gardens, Christchurch Gardens, Bramford Gardens

View the facilities

Dog control map